Lesbian Review of Books | Review #10
Mrs. Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf
Ahhh, Virginia Woolf. is there a bookish queermo alive whose personal journey has not been influenced by Virginia Woolf in one way or another? If you are such a person who managed to avoid Woolf during your formative years, come in, come in. Have a seat next to me. would you like a whiskey? Of course you would. Come in, we have hours upon hours of breathless Woolfian prose to deconstruct.
There is absolutely no question that Clarissa is a big ol’ lesbian. I shall hear no arguments. I shall allow my heartstrings to go untugged by any of Peter’s poetic manpain. Clarissa may have been a consummate socialite, a proper lady, and an impeccable hostess, but she was absolutely queer as all heck. Peter offered her a slightly different life with him, but Sally Seton showed her life itself, “the radiance burnt through, the revelation, the religious feeling!” Remember the first time you kissed a girl and everything felt more right? So does Clarissa.
As you may know, Michael Cunningham already wrote an Everything Is Lesbians version of Mrs. Dalloway called The Hours, which is lovely except that everything is not lesbians. Elizabeth, obviously a missed opportunity for a lesbian and a budding misandrist. Peter and Richard, also lesbians, because why have the triumph of Clarissa actually getting to marry a lady if she’s just going to agonize over men the whole book? The even gayer AU begs to be written. Septimus may remain Septimus, but I might have prescribed Lucrezia a nice lesbian affair if I were her doctor.
Verdict: I would say not enough lesbians, but I don’t think our dear Clarissa would have considered Active Lesbianism a viable life choice. Even if there were more lesbians it would only result in gay tears. Allow it to remain a formative queer experience and move on to greener (gayer) pastures.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #10

Mrs. Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf

Ahhh, Virginia Woolf. is there a bookish queermo alive whose personal journey has not been influenced by Virginia Woolf in one way or another? If you are such a person who managed to avoid Woolf during your formative years, come in, come in. Have a seat next to me. would you like a whiskey? Of course you would. Come in, we have hours upon hours of breathless Woolfian prose to deconstruct.

There is absolutely no question that Clarissa is a big ol’ lesbian. I shall hear no arguments. I shall allow my heartstrings to go untugged by any of Peter’s poetic manpain. Clarissa may have been a consummate socialite, a proper lady, and an impeccable hostess, but she was absolutely queer as all heck. Peter offered her a slightly different life with him, but Sally Seton showed her life itself, “the radiance burnt through, the revelation, the religious feeling!” Remember the first time you kissed a girl and everything felt more right? So does Clarissa.

As you may know, Michael Cunningham already wrote an Everything Is Lesbians version of Mrs. Dalloway called The Hours, which is lovely except that everything is not lesbians. Elizabeth, obviously a missed opportunity for a lesbian and a budding misandrist. Peter and Richard, also lesbians, because why have the triumph of Clarissa actually getting to marry a lady if she’s just going to agonize over men the whole book? The even gayer AU begs to be written. Septimus may remain Septimus, but I might have prescribed Lucrezia a nice lesbian affair if I were her doctor.

Verdict: I would say not enough lesbians, but I don’t think our dear Clarissa would have considered Active Lesbianism a viable life choice. Even if there were more lesbians it would only result in gay tears. Allow it to remain a formative queer experience and move on to greener (gayer) pastures.

Lesbian Review of Books | #9
Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte
Oh, Jane. Jane, Jane, Jane. I almost can’t believe she’s not a lesbian. I mean, look at her. She’s an introverted, poor, orphaned governess. Just give her an androgynous haircut, some cats, and a Tumblr, and she’d be cruising OkCupid like a pro. Seriously though, Jane’s a stereotypical spinster — which usually means a huge lesbo.
Instead, Jane decides crazy Mr. Rochester is the one for her. And yes, she had to do a little soul-searching after the whole keeping-his-ex-wife-in-the-attic thing, but she still ends up with him. I can pretty much say that this is a universal sign for insanity. This is like that crazy lesbian relationship all your friends say is a bad idea, and while you’re at brunch with them, drinking mimosas, you think, “Yes! It’s a terrible idea! She’s nuts!” but then you go home, and she’s lounging on the bed in a pair of men’s boxers, and, well, fuck it. You’re only human, and she has hipbones.
I would say this even if it were Miss Rochester, the hot and broody single lady (who takes in her ex-girlfriend’s daughter). Miss Rochester is infinitely better because, hey, obviously, but let’s get real — locking exes in the attic so they end up setting the house on fire is still a sign of batshit cray for all genders and sexual orientations.
Verdict: if this had lesbians, it would play like an episode of the L Word. I can’t decide which crazy broad is Jenny Schecter, so she can play them all.

Lesbian Review of Books | #9

Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte

Oh, Jane. Jane, Jane, Jane. I almost can’t believe she’s not a lesbian. I mean, look at her. She’s an introverted, poor, orphaned governess. Just give her an androgynous haircut, some cats, and a Tumblr, and she’d be cruising OkCupid like a pro. Seriously though, Jane’s a stereotypical spinster — which usually means a huge lesbo.

Instead, Jane decides crazy Mr. Rochester is the one for her. And yes, she had to do a little soul-searching after the whole keeping-his-ex-wife-in-the-attic thing, but she still ends up with him. I can pretty much say that this is a universal sign for insanity. This is like that crazy lesbian relationship all your friends say is a bad idea, and while you’re at brunch with them, drinking mimosas, you think, “Yes! It’s a terrible idea! She’s nuts!” but then you go home, and she’s lounging on the bed in a pair of men’s boxers, and, well, fuck it. You’re only human, and she has hipbones.

I would say this even if it were Miss Rochester, the hot and broody single lady (who takes in her ex-girlfriend’s daughter). Miss Rochester is infinitely better because, hey, obviously, but let’s get real — locking exes in the attic so they end up setting the house on fire is still a sign of batshit cray for all genders and sexual orientations.

Verdict: if this had lesbians, it would play like an episode of the L Word. I can’t decide which crazy broad is Jenny Schecter, so she can play them all.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #8
Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott
I count three lesbians in Little Women. Aunt March is a classic eccentric gay aunt. Beth, gentle and pious and uninterested in any romance, is the Gay Nun of the March sisters (I hear your she’s just very shy argument and I counter with gay Emily Dickinson. being shy and being into ladies are obviously not mutually exclusive. like, have you been to ladies’ night at a gay bar ever, you can’t buy a drink without interrupting someone’s longing glance that will never be acted upon). Also tragic lesbian death: Beth has one. And lastly, Jo. Duh.
Jo checks off every square on the dyke bingo card: clumsy, fiercely tomboyish, prone to questionable hairstyle choices, etc. She is almost too gay, because I, like most bookish girls of all ages (except, evidently, my co-reviewer), was all for Jo falling in love with Laurie. But lamenting hetero ships and making people less gay by argument (from a 6 to a 5.5, is all I’m saying, just enough for Teddy Laurence—Jo’d still be gayer than Katherine Hepburn) are not under the purview of LRB. If only Laurie had been a lesbian.
Related, Mr. Bhaer is a ridiculous character and should’ve been Ms. Bhaer, a soft-spoken professor with a steely intellect, who would awe and inspire Jo to great genius in her writing. It makes so much sense I shouldn’t have to explain it, but just in case, here’s my reasoning: Jo’s a goddamn lesbian.
As for the rest of the sisters, how much would baby dyke Amy have annoyed Jo? Answer: a hilarious amount. And I am not making a case for Meg. She named her son Demijohn, literally “halfJohn,” literally reminder that this baby owes half its conception to John’s sperm, which he put inside her with his penis. I can do nothing against such a strong devotion to heterosexuality. Verdict: not enough lesbians.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #8

Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott

I count three lesbians in Little Women. Aunt March is a classic eccentric gay aunt. Beth, gentle and pious and uninterested in any romance, is the Gay Nun of the March sisters (I hear your she’s just very shy argument and I counter with gay Emily Dickinson. being shy and being into ladies are obviously not mutually exclusive. like, have you been to ladies’ night at a gay bar ever, you can’t buy a drink without interrupting someone’s longing glance that will never be acted upon). Also tragic lesbian death: Beth has one. And lastly, Jo. Duh.

Jo checks off every square on the dyke bingo card: clumsy, fiercely tomboyish, prone to questionable hairstyle choices, etc. She is almost too gay, because I, like most bookish girls of all ages (except, evidently, my co-reviewer), was all for Jo falling in love with Laurie. But lamenting hetero ships and making people less gay by argument (from a 6 to a 5.5, is all I’m saying, just enough for Teddy Laurence—Jo’d still be gayer than Katherine Hepburn) are not under the purview of LRB. If only Laurie had been a lesbian.

Related, Mr. Bhaer is a ridiculous character and should’ve been Ms. Bhaer, a soft-spoken professor with a steely intellect, who would awe and inspire Jo to great genius in her writing. It makes so much sense I shouldn’t have to explain it, but just in case, here’s my reasoning: Jo’s a goddamn lesbian.

As for the rest of the sisters, how much would baby dyke Amy have annoyed Jo? Answer: a hilarious amount. And I am not making a case for Meg. She named her son Demijohn, literally “halfJohn,” literally reminder that this baby owes half its conception to John’s sperm, which he put inside her with his penis. I can do nothing against such a strong devotion to heterosexuality. Verdict: not enough lesbians.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #7
Emma, by Jane Austen
Apparently a picture of Emma, the book, is just too difficult, so we’ll have to settle for Romola Garai’s beautiful face from the BBC miniseries (which I have maybe watched five or six times, but who’s counting). You want that face to be kissing another girl, for sure. And given Emma’s obsession with setting her female friends up, I think we can easily lean in the way of LESBIAN. Then again, any of the characters could have been a lesbian. Easily.
Harriet Smith, actually interested in one of Robert Martin’s sisters, but the girl is too common and plain for Emma to accept for her dear friend. Then there’s orphaned Jane Fairfax, suffering through her silent and secret engagement to Frances Churchill, who flirts with Emma to dissuade her aunt from disinheriting her. And, of course, Georgina Knightley. Everyone likes an older woman — particularly Emma.
Everything would benefit from Emma having more lesbians, including and maybe most importantly, Clueless. Alicia Silverstone macking on some ladies? Yes, please.
Verdict: everyone could’ve been a lesbian. Shame on you, Jane, for not putting even one in, not even as a lonely lesbian spinster.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #7

Emma, by Jane Austen

Apparently a picture of Emma, the book, is just too difficult, so we’ll have to settle for Romola Garai’s beautiful face from the BBC miniseries (which I have maybe watched five or six times, but who’s counting). You want that face to be kissing another girl, for sure. And given Emma’s obsession with setting her female friends up, I think we can easily lean in the way of LESBIAN. Then again, any of the characters could have been a lesbian. Easily.

Harriet Smith, actually interested in one of Robert Martin’s sisters, but the girl is too common and plain for Emma to accept for her dear friend. Then there’s orphaned Jane Fairfax, suffering through her silent and secret engagement to Frances Churchill, who flirts with Emma to dissuade her aunt from disinheriting her. And, of course, Georgina Knightley. Everyone likes an older woman — particularly Emma.

Everything would benefit from Emma having more lesbians, including and maybe most importantly, Clueless. Alicia Silverstone macking on some ladies? Yes, please.

Verdict: everyone could’ve been a lesbian. Shame on you, Jane, for not putting even one in, not even as a lonely lesbian spinster.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #6
The Outsiders, by S. E. Hinton
It was impossible to find a cover of The Outsiders that didn’t include at least three dudes, which is a shame because if you read it the right way (the lesbian way), The Outsiders is full of lesbians and lesbians only!
Actually no, the promo pic above only helps my point: because most of the greasers have gender-neutral names*, The Outsiders can easily be a book about a street gang of butch lesbians rumbling with the slick rich socs (also butch lesbians) and chatting up girls (also lesbians, butch optional) at the gas station. Just look at Rob Lowe, who played Sodapop, the handsomest lil greaser who ever dropped out of high school. Damned if young Rob Lowe doesn’t make a handsome lesbian as well.
Every last one of those brat pack heartthrobs should’ve been recast with a butch lesbian; the aesthetic and the poignancy of the story would have remained the same, yet I would have been 10000% more interested. Think of it. Think of the tenuous, unspoken love between Dally, the tuffest kid from the streets of New York, and slight, shy Johnny with a courageous heart of gold. Now imagine that they were also lesbians. Now imagine that Dally was played by a woman with a passing resemblance to Matt Dillon. Yes, I KNOW, I too am in half-swoon. There are countless other ways this book could have contained lesbians, but this is the only way that 1) gives us the butch lesbian street gangs we so need from the world, and 2) doesn’t mess up the simple two gang narrative. This is The Outsiders, not Gangs of New York.
The Outsiders made me wince several times and want to name my child Sodapop just for the nickname potential. Verdict: not enough lesbians/100% lesbians, depending on how you read it. I vary. It is the Schrodinger’s box of lesbians.
*If you are pronoun-sensitive, it is no stretch of the imagination at all to include several genderqueer/trans people in the gang, alternately, Calibre has a tool for that.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #6

The Outsiders, by S. E. Hinton

It was impossible to find a cover of The Outsiders that didn’t include at least three dudes, which is a shame because if you read it the right way (the lesbian way), The Outsiders is full of lesbians and lesbians only!

Actually no, the promo pic above only helps my point: because most of the greasers have gender-neutral names*, The Outsiders can easily be a book about a street gang of butch lesbians rumbling with the slick rich socs (also butch lesbians) and chatting up girls (also lesbians, butch optional) at the gas station. Just look at Rob Lowe, who played Sodapop, the handsomest lil greaser who ever dropped out of high school. Damned if young Rob Lowe doesn’t make a handsome lesbian as well.

Every last one of those brat pack heartthrobs should’ve been recast with a butch lesbian; the aesthetic and the poignancy of the story would have remained the same, yet I would have been 10000% more interested. Think of it. Think of the tenuous, unspoken love between Dally, the tuffest kid from the streets of New York, and slight, shy Johnny with a courageous heart of gold. Now imagine that they were also lesbians. Now imagine that Dally was played by a woman with a passing resemblance to Matt Dillon. Yes, I KNOW, I too am in half-swoon. There are countless other ways this book could have contained lesbians, but this is the only way that 1) gives us the butch lesbian street gangs we so need from the world, and 2) doesn’t mess up the simple two gang narrative. This is The Outsiders, not Gangs of New York.

The Outsiders made me wince several times and want to name my child Sodapop just for the nickname potential. Verdict: not enough lesbians/100% lesbians, depending on how you read it. I vary. It is the Schrodinger’s box of lesbians.

*If you are pronoun-sensitive, it is no stretch of the imagination at all to include several genderqueer/trans people in the gang, alternately, Calibre has a tool for that.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #5
The Fountainhead, by Ayn Rand
First, I would like to share that the first time I read The Fountainhead was in high school, and it was because I wanted to impress a boy I had a crush on, who was also reading it. My motives were as lesbian as The Fountainhead itself, so, not at all.
Y’all, there is not one lesbian in The Fountainhead. I was under the impression that Dominique would eventually come out as a lesbian and it would be framed as a consciously spiteful decision on her part. I was violently mistaken. But! I can make a convincing yet specious argument (convincing yet specious: the story of my undergrad career) for Dominique Francon: Lesbian Because Ideology as the platonic ideal of a Randian heroine. Take my convincing word for it that Dominique should have been a lesbian.
Also, Keating and Roark never hatefuck, like they don’t even do it once, so that’s a triple-missed opportunity: lesbians, hatefucking, and lesbians hatefucking. I would also not have objected to a maverick third architect who never had formal training and yet is aces at sharking their clients and is, can you guess, a lesbian. Think of how many more convoluted plots could have arisen from adding such a maverick. Think of all the manifestos.
This book made me (more of) an insufferable tool for a few months. That boy ended up asking me to prom, and I said yes. Verdict: not enough lesbians.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #5

The Fountainhead, by Ayn Rand

First, I would like to share that the first time I read The Fountainhead was in high school, and it was because I wanted to impress a boy I had a crush on, who was also reading it. My motives were as lesbian as The Fountainhead itself, so, not at all.

Y’all, there is not one lesbian in The Fountainhead. I was under the impression that Dominique would eventually come out as a lesbian and it would be framed as a consciously spiteful decision on her part. I was violently mistaken. But! I can make a convincing yet specious argument (convincing yet specious: the story of my undergrad career) for Dominique Francon: Lesbian Because Ideology as the platonic ideal of a Randian heroine. Take my convincing word for it that Dominique should have been a lesbian.

Also, Keating and Roark never hatefuck, like they don’t even do it once, so that’s a triple-missed opportunity: lesbians, hatefucking, and lesbians hatefucking. I would also not have objected to a maverick third architect who never had formal training and yet is aces at sharking their clients and is, can you guess, a lesbian. Think of how many more convoluted plots could have arisen from adding such a maverick. Think of all the manifestos.

This book made me (more of) an insufferable tool for a few months. That boy ended up asking me to prom, and I said yes. Verdict: not enough lesbians.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #4
The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown
I know, I used a promo picture from the movie. But let’s face it, what’s it ruining? Are we just going to sit around, pretending this book has integrity? Let’s just move on.
Though it’s a given rule that just about any book could use a lesbian, I’m actually okay with the lack of homos in this case. Our only lesbian option is really Sophie — and while police cryptographer dyke would be pretty hot — this book is bad enough that it doesn’t deserve a lesbian. This book is bad enough that it’s fine that everyone is straight. Actually, we should all breathe a collective sigh of relief that we escaped. Whew.
Who knows what would have happened if Dan Brown made Sophie a lesbian. She probably would’ve met an untimely end, as fictional lesbians are wont to do (you know this book is practically screaming tragic lesbian death). Or her sexuality would have been disregarded entirely, and she would have shacked up with Robert Langdon, sexy Harvard professor, anyway. Ugh, gross.
Verdict: no lesbians, which is just the right amount of lesbians, so let me revise and say — the perfect amount of lesbians.
(Dan Brown deserves no toasts. None for you, Dan Brown!)

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #4

The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown

I know, I used a promo picture from the movie. But let’s face it, what’s it ruining? Are we just going to sit around, pretending this book has integrity? Let’s just move on.

Though it’s a given rule that just about any book could use a lesbian, I’m actually okay with the lack of homos in this case. Our only lesbian option is really Sophie — and while police cryptographer dyke would be pretty hot — this book is bad enough that it doesn’t deserve a lesbian. This book is bad enough that it’s fine that everyone is straight. Actually, we should all breathe a collective sigh of relief that we escaped. Whew.

Who knows what would have happened if Dan Brown made Sophie a lesbian. She probably would’ve met an untimely end, as fictional lesbians are wont to do (you know this book is practically screaming tragic lesbian death). Or her sexuality would have been disregarded entirely, and she would have shacked up with Robert Langdon, sexy Harvard professor, anyway. Ugh, gross.

Verdict: no lesbians, which is just the right amount of lesbians, so let me revise and say — the perfect amount of lesbians.

(Dan Brown deserves no toasts. None for you, Dan Brown!)

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #3
The Catcher in the Rye, by J. D. Salinger
Obviously Holden Caulfield would have made a great lesbian. Picture this: Holden as portrayed by Kristen Stewart, in too-big combat boots and that red hunting hat. Doesn’t that make the book better? Instead of dredging up memories of your slightly mildewy high school English classroom, you’re sighing dreamily at your computer screen as you imagine Kristen Stewart-Caulfield walking through the winter Manhattan streets, thinking about phoniness and women. A brash adolescent queermo, isolated and out of place. We have all felt that in our youth.
Besides, lesbians + coming-of-age angst = goldmine.
Seriously, Salinger, one lesbian would have done it. JUST ONE. Not even asking for a lot here. Well. I’ll just shake my head and give you an exasperated sigh instead. Verdict: not enough lesbians.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #3

The Catcher in the Rye, by J. D. Salinger

Obviously Holden Caulfield would have made a great lesbian. Picture this: Holden as portrayed by Kristen Stewart, in too-big combat boots and that red hunting hat. Doesn’t that make the book better? Instead of dredging up memories of your slightly mildewy high school English classroom, you’re sighing dreamily at your computer screen as you imagine Kristen Stewart-Caulfield walking through the winter Manhattan streets, thinking about phoniness and women. A brash adolescent queermo, isolated and out of place. We have all felt that in our youth.

Besides, lesbians + coming-of-age angst = goldmine.

Seriously, Salinger, one lesbian would have done it. JUST ONE. Not even asking for a lot here. Well. I’ll just shake my head and give you an exasperated sigh instead. Verdict: not enough lesbians.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #2
The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
LRB is going on the record and establishing this early: Jordan Baker is a lesbian. A big ol’ golf-playin’ gaymo. LRB is claiming that one for the team. Also a gaymo: Nick Carraway, and if Nick had been a lesbian maybe this entire book would have turned out differently, but instead it’s like, “You’re a bad driver,” “I’m safe until I meet another bad driver,” “Turns out we’re both bad drivers,” what’s the deal, it’s like this driving analogy carries the foreshadowing of the entire novel on its back. Is “bad driver” also code for “gayer than having gay sex in the gay bathroom of a Prohibition Gay Club”? I would not be surprised.
Codewords aside, you know who else could’ve been a lesbian? Daisy. Also Gatsby. DAISY AND HER BUTCH GIRLFRIEND JAY GATSBY. Would this tragic class romance between a West Egger and East Egger have been even better if everyone in it were a lesbian? Probably. (except for Tom, no one likes Tom, but he can stay and be The Object Of Misandry)
This book made me shake my fist at least once and want to plan two coming out parties. Verdict: not enough lesbians.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #2

The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

LRB is going on the record and establishing this early: Jordan Baker is a lesbian. A big ol’ golf-playin’ gaymo. LRB is claiming that one for the team. Also a gaymo: Nick Carraway, and if Nick had been a lesbian maybe this entire book would have turned out differently, but instead it’s like, “You’re a bad driver,” “I’m safe until I meet another bad driver,” “Turns out we’re both bad drivers,” what’s the deal, it’s like this driving analogy carries the foreshadowing of the entire novel on its back. Is “bad driver” also code for “gayer than having gay sex in the gay bathroom of a Prohibition Gay Club”? I would not be surprised.

Codewords aside, you know who else could’ve been a lesbian? Daisy. Also Gatsby. DAISY AND HER BUTCH GIRLFRIEND JAY GATSBY. Would this tragic class romance between a West Egger and East Egger have been even better if everyone in it were a lesbian? Probably. (except for Tom, no one likes Tom, but he can stay and be The Object Of Misandry)

This book made me shake my fist at least once and want to plan two coming out parties. Verdict: not enough lesbians.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #1 
The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway
Literally an old man at sea. Not one lesbian. The sea is not a metaphor for lesbians. Neither is the fish. The fish is a metaphor for nature, or maybe it’s meant to be an ichthys, but wouldn’t it be better if it were also a lesbian? Oh man, think of all the layers that would add. Or maybe the sea contained lesbian mermaids? So many missed opportunities, and in the end all we get is a lot of Christ imagery and not even a fish.
This book made me shake my head in disappointment—but fond disappointment!—twice and then I stopped. It is not Hemingway’s fault that lesbians are not native to the sea, and it is, after all, Man vs Nature, not Man vs Nature, More Specifically Nature’s Lesbians. Verdict: not enough lesbians.

Lesbian Review of Books | Review #1 

The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway

Literally an old man at sea. Not one lesbian. The sea is not a metaphor for lesbians. Neither is the fish. The fish is a metaphor for nature, or maybe it’s meant to be an ichthys, but wouldn’t it be better if it were also a lesbian? Oh man, think of all the layers that would add. Or maybe the sea contained lesbian mermaids? So many missed opportunities, and in the end all we get is a lot of Christ imagery and not even a fish.

This book made me shake my head in disappointment—but fond disappointment!—twice and then I stopped. It is not Hemingway’s fault that lesbians are not native to the sea, and it is, after all, Man vs Nature, not Man vs Nature, More Specifically Nature’s Lesbians. Verdict: not enough lesbians.